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Edition 12.34 Yamagami's Garden Center August 23, 2012

Featured Quote:

"Nature does have manure and she does have roots as well as blossoms, and you can't hate the manure and blame the roots for not being blossoms."

~ Buckminster Fuller


Water-Wise Plants For California Gardens

Fall is an ideal time to plant California natives and other water-wise plants because the soil temperature encourages vigorous rooting, yet the air temperature is starting to cool down. These conditions give the plants a chance to get their roots established so they can support a burst of growth in the spring and then help the plant through the dryness of summer.


Come in to see the California natives and other water-wise plants we offer. You will be surprised how attractive they can be. Many offer colorful flowers as well as different colors and textures of foliage.

They can all be used separately and together for a harmonious look with shared cultural needs. When your goal is low water use, it's important to plant in compatible communities.


Mike CraibWe are offering a FREE "California Natives and Other Water-wise Garden Plants" class on September 1st at 10 AM.

Our speaker is Mike Craib, a native plant expert and all-around plantsman. He will present selections for every aspect of a landscape from trees to groundcovers. Don't miss this chance to talk with Mike. Look for special offers on the plants he features!


Some of the California native plants Mike will discuss are Western Virgin's Bower (Clematis ligusticifolia), a lovely vine or groundcover; Fernleaf Catalina Ironwood (Lyonothamnus floribundus var. asplenifolius), a handsome evergreen tree; and the very showy Island Snapdragon (Galvezia speciosa 'Boca Rosa').


Western Virgin's Bower (Clematis ligusticifolia)


Fernleaf Catalina Ironwood
(Lyonothamnus floribundus var. asplenifolius)


Island Snapdragon (Galvezia speciosa 'Boca Rosa')

End of Summer Fruit Tree Care

Time to prune apricot trees! Do not prune them in January or any other time it is cool and wet. That is when they are susceptible to Eutypa dieback. You can summer-prune for size while there is still fruit on the tree, then again after harvest. All pruning should be done by early September.

Come see a FREE Apricot Pruning Demo on Saturday, September 15th, from 8:30 to 10 AM in the parking lot on the side of Yamagami's Nursery. Participants will receive a coupon for 10% OFF bareroot fruit tree orders.

After the harvest, it's time to fertilize and deep water your deciduous (loses leaves in winter) fruit trees. We recommend all-organic Dr. Earth Fruit Tree Fertilizer. It helps to replenish the tree after the stress of fruit bearing, plus some of the fertilizer will be stored by the tree for the big spring push next year.

Check your apple and pear trees for evidence of fireblight. You will recognize it by dead, black branches. Prune the dead branch off about 12" below where you see the black. Do not compost the clippings, throw them away. Use aerosol Lysol Household Disinfectant to sterilize your pruning shear blades in between cuts.


Plant Herbs Now for Holiday Feasts!

Fresh herbs, planted now, will be large enough to provide some harvest for your holiday feasts. Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme (and many more) are an important part of many feasts. Fresh herbs add a zest that stale packaged herbs just cannot duplicate.

Short on space? Herbs make great container plants. While those cute little windowsill pots are appealing, the herbs will grow much better outdoors in the ground or in larger pots. They need a lot of sun to develop the oils that hold their distinctive flavors. While you are planting herbs for yourself, consider planting some pots to give as hostess gifts or housewarming gifts.

Peninsula Herb Society
Interested in growing herbs? Linda White, from Los Altos, is interested in forming a Peninsula Herb Society. She envisions the group sharing their culinary adventures as well as their herb gardening experiences. If interested, you can contact her at rlkwhite2@gmail.com for more info.


Fight Grubs NOW!

Time to prevent the annual autumn raccoon grubfest on your lawn. Those masked rascals like nothing better than a moonlight grub hunt. They can rip up an entire lawn in just days (actually nights) as they feast on nearly dormant (and plumped up for the winter) grubs. ACT NOW if you have experienced this before, if your neighbors have, if you see brown patches in your lawn or have seen June bugs around.  These are all warnings that you will likely be a target this fall.

Protect your lawn and garden the natural, safer way with Safer Grub Killer . It comes in a handy hose-end sprayer bottle for ease of application. Its active ingredient is neem oil, the extract of the neem tree. It will also take care of cutworms, sod webworms and many other pests. This is definitely the case where an ounce of prevention is worth a ton of cure!


Prop-A-Crops Are Back!!

Save your fruit trees and your harvests with Prop-A-Crops! There have been some bumper crops this year and we ran out of Prop-A-Crops early. They are back in stock now, just in time for late harvests. Apple, pear, persimmon, and late peach and nectarine trees can all use some help holding up their heavy crops.

Take a look at your trees and pick up the Prop-A-Crops you need for your garden of eatin'.



Coming Events


Saturday, September 1st at 10 AM
California Natives and Other Water-Wise Plants
with Mike Craib. Mike will show a variety of attractive water-wise plants for California gardens. FREE!

Look for special offers on the featured plants that day!


Saturday, September 15th
Free Apricot Tree And Summer Pruning Demo with Bradley Strawhorn from 8:30 AM to 10 AM
. Drop in. No reservations needed.


Ongoing Events


Friday mornings, 11 AM to 1 PM

Come let Dianne Jensen guide you through the design and planting process of creating your own colorful container gardens and salad bowls. All you pay for is the plants and container; the soil, fertilizer and instruction are FREE!



Blueberry Peach Panzanella


A farmers' market twist on an Italian classic: Sweet peaches, crisp blueberries and bitter arugula are a fantastic combination in this delicious, unexpected salad.

What You Need

  • 4 slices artisinal bread
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil (divided)
  • 1 red onion (halved)
  • 2 tablespoons champagne vinegar
  • 4 peaches (pitted and chopped)
  • 3/4 cup blueberries
  • 1/4 cup basil (cut into thin ribbons)
  • 1 bunch arugula (chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Step by Step

  • Heat a grill pan or grill to medium heat. Rub bread with 1 tablespoon olive oil and grill until crispy and slightly charred.
  • Remove from heat and rub with halved shallot or onion.
  • Once cool enough to handle, cut slices into small cubes.
  • Slice shallot or onion into thin half-moons and place in a small bowl with vinegar and a pinch of salt.
  • Set aside and allow to macerate for 15 minutes.
  • Gently combine peaches, blueberries and cubed bread in a medium mixing bowl.
  • Add a pinch of salt and the remaining olive oil. Fold in basil.
  • Gently add arugula to salad and toss. Add macerated shallot or onion and vinegar.
  • Taste salad for seasoning, adding more salt, pepper or vinegar as needed.
  • Serve immediately.

Source: Market Chef Erica Emme
Recipe from Pacific Coast Farmers' Market Association - www.pcfma.com

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Since 1948, Yamagami's Nursery has been committed to the promotion of beauty and the plants, products and friendly, professional support needed to attain and maintain that Beauty. In my parents' footsteps (and Taro Yamagami's before them), I promise to continue that tradition. I invite you to visit us in the nursery and on our website, yamagamisnursery.com for help in making your yard into a beautiful garden.
Thanks for visiting,

Preston Oka

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Telephone:
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Address:
1361 S. De Anza Blvd
Cupertino, CA 95014

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